Logo for Piano Play It

Mitsuko Uchida

by Patricia Evans

Guys, Nobody plays Mozart so beuatifully like Mitsuko Uchida.

Thie video is full of beauty, I hope you ap?reciate it.

Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271.
A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece.

It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very
fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of
joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart.

1. Allegro, in E flat major and common (C) time

2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time

3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and 2/2 time

Dawn Chan notes:

Renowned pianist Alfred Brendel has referred to Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9, known as the Jeunehomme, as a "wonder of the world," going so far as to assert that Mozart "did not surpass this piece in the later piano concertos."

Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005:


Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is, Beethoven the "Emperor" Concerto or "Moonlight" Sonata, or Schubert the "Unfinished" Symphony. The names sometimes come from savvy publishers who know they can improve sales, or from impresarios, critics, or performers. The case of the Concerto we hear today is particularly interesting, and only recently explained. Little is known of the genesis or first performance of the E-flat Concerto. Twentieth-century accounts usually stated that Mozart composed it for a French keyboard virtuoso named Mademoiselle Jeunehomme, who visited Salzburg in the winter of 1777. Nothing else was known, not even the woman's first name.

Last year, the Viennese musicologist Michael Lorenz, a specialist in the music of Mozart's and Schubert's time and a brilliant archival detective, figured out the mystery. The nickname was coined by the French scholars Théodore de Wyzewa and Georges de Saint-Foix in their classic early-20th-century study of the composer. As Lorenz explains, "Since one of their favorite names for Mozart was 'jeune homme' (young man), they presented this person as 'Mademoiselle Jeunehomme.'"

In a September 1778 letter Mozart wrote to his father, he referred to three recent concertos, "one for the jenomy K. 271, litzau K. 246, and one in B-flat K. 238" that he was selling to a publisher. Leopold later called the first pianist "Madame genomai." (Spellings were often variable and phonetic at the time.) Lorenz has identified her as Victoire Jenamy, born in Strasbourg in 1749 and married to a rich merchant, Joseph Jenamy, in 1768. Victoire was the daughter of the celebrated dancer and choreographer Jean Georges Noverre (1727-1810), who was a good friend of Mozart's. He had choreographed a 1772 Milan production of Mozart's opera Lucio Silla and later commissioned the ballet Les Petits Riens for Paris. Although we still know little about Victoire Jenamy?she does not appear to have been a professional musician, though clearly Mozart admired her playing?Mozart's first great piano concerto can now rightly be called by its proper name: "Jenamy."

Click here to post comments

Return to Free Piano Videos.

Join Our Facebook Group...

Summer Sale - Save 50% and Get Full Access to Our Courses:

The Rocket Piano Ultimate Piano Learning Kit

"Your entire site is simply fantastic. I really loved it. Now I am learning the basics of piano by myself, with your really great help. Thank you very much!"

Jaime C. from Brazil

Play ALL your favourite Pop, Rock songs (by artists like Adele, The Beatles, Bruno Mars, Nina Simone etc...) Combine the right hand with the left hand and learn to know which rhythm to play!

The Ultimate Piano by Chords Learning Kit
Check It Out Now!

"I only started to play about six weeks ago but the last hour of watching your videos about chord progressions has been something of a revelation. You're brilliant!!!!"

Stephen Roberts from U.S.A

"I'm a beginning keyboard player and your video's are an excellent guide. You're absolute not in a hurry, and take time to explain. I'm sure I'll follow all your lessons to get the hang of playing the piano/keyboard!"

Wouter E. from the Netherlands

"Thanks for all your work ( tuto and others ). You're doing a really great job, You're the best internet teacher I know."

Anthony Hassen Cohen from France

"I really appreciate what you do for piano lovers and I'll let everyone interested I know to come visit your website and see how magnificent it is organized and how much you are really helpful to us beginners."

Mohamed B. from Egypt

"Thank you so much for all these piano lessons! You really make it easier for some of us who always wanted to play piano and have no musical experience."

Luis S. from the U.S.A

"Today I watched your video on "how to play piano by ear" and was totally amazed at how well you teach. I wish I lived close by, I would hire you for lessons."

Douglas Grendahl from U.S.A

[?] Subscribe To
This Site

Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Add to Newsgator
Subscribe with Bloglines

Enjoy This Site?
Then why not use the button below, to add us to your favorite bookmarking service?

Copyright piano-play-it.com © 2008-2013.